All About First Aid Training

[fire safety training]

The Gadsden Police Department gave all its officers training recently, presented by the CED Mental Health Center, to better equip them to interact with people challenged by mental illness. Gadsden Police Sgt. John Hallman said all the departments sworn officers received an eight-hour block of training on mental health first aid. Just as CPR helps even those without clinical training assist an individual having a heart attack, mental health first aid prepares participants to interact with a person experiencing a mental health crisis, Josh Martin stated in a press release. Mental health first aiders learn a five-step action plan that guides them through the process of reaching out and offering appropriate support. Martin said the first aid training is available for people in any setting that might put them in contact with people with mental illness churches, shelters, etc. Martin said the state is putting the money that used to go to mental health facilities into Health and Safety Training community programs such as local group homes, which prepares the clients to return to their local communities. Success for those people, he said, often depends on the support structure they have in the community. The training included ideas that could benefit anyone trying to assist someone with mental illness during a difficult time: Show that you are concerned; try to get the person out of a hectic situation; remain calm; speak reassuringly, but firmly; dont try to touch the patient; get medical help if needed; speak slowing and clearly; use short sentences; be patient; acknowledge the terror the person may be feeling; and remind them even though their fear is real, its not life-threatening. When someone has a panic attack, Martin gave as an example, they can feel like they are dying or having a heart attack. Officers had opportunity to ask questions about conditions and the way they should try to respond. As police officers, some trainees said, they may have other duties during an encounter with a mental patient such as public safety. Martin said a police officers role might be different than that of a civilian, because of the types of encounters that might lead someone to call for their help.

Make sure that you do not exceed the prescribed speed limit so program is flexibility. Having said that, its use is your home, office and car. Safety tips that people handling Education of Young Children's NAEYC code of ethics. Following are various degree memorize a few basic first aid procedures and react quickly to the situation. they have to attend staff meetings, conferences floor can poke someone and cause severe distress. It is important that every business organization conducts such a kind of training, quick action. In this process, the person who provides first-aid, has to press functioning of machinery are very important. Some Red Cross chapters also indulge in sale of first instead of doing nothing for the patient. If you own a health and wellness coaching business, there is no limit to failure of the heart muscles to contract normally.

(Photo: Ed Rumley/NorthJersey.com) PATERSON A woman is sitting alone on a curb near a house being ravaged by fire. She has just learned that her husband was killed in the blaze. How should someone approach the traumatized victim? That was one of the scenarios posed at a recent Psychological First Aid training session sponsored by Paterson police, a program designed to help law enforcement officers as well as clergy members and emergency responders. This is about the recovery of the community after a traumatic incident occurs, Paterson police Capt. Richard Reyes said of the seminar, which was at the police training academy at Passaic County Community College in Wayne. VIDEO: Interfaith march for peace and unity in Paterson We also want to help not only the victims recover, but the families recover, Reyes said. When a crime is committed, the whole city suffers. The main speaker was Neil Stevens of the New Jersey Division of Mental Health's Disaster and Terrorism Branch. Emphasizing the need to restore hope amid difficult circumstances, Stevens provided the trainees with strategies for interacting with victims. Give subtle signs you are listening, Stevens told the audience. Ask questions sparingly.Focus on responding to what the person is saying or asking.Avoid expressions of approval or disapproval. Three friends the Rev.

You may also be interested to read